Dark Chocolate Buckwheat Cookies


Last month, I began participating in the Secret Recipe Club. It’s a fun project I’m using to broaden my horizons by being linked annonymously to another food blogger. I then peruse her (his) posts, and select one to make myself. My assignment [insert James Bond music] for September was Passionate about Baking, an intricate baking blog from a woman in India. Fortunately, we share an interest in buckwheat, so I enjoyed perusing a number of buckwheat-based recipes, like some delightful fig tarts. Previously, I wrote a little about why buckwheat is an excellent alternative grain.

The recipe I actually managed to make was Nibbly Buckwheat Chocolate Cookies. In fact, I made it twice. The first time, they came out dark grey because I used whole grain buckwheat flour and no wheat flour. Sigh. Incredibly ugly, and I did not think cookies could look so unappealing. I didn’t even take a single photo. Round two, I used cocoa powder as the primary replacement for wheat flour and they look presentable. Next time, I would increase the starch slightly for a more solid cookie.

Double Chocolate Cookies

75 g buckwheat flour (1/2 c + 2 T)
2 T ground flaxseeds
4 T cocoa powder
1 T tapoica starch
1 stick butter (8 T)
2/3 c sugar
1/2 t vanilla
1 oz baking chocolate, chopped

Mix together the flour, flaxseeds, cocoa, and tapioca starch. Beat the butter and sugar until it’s shiney (stop before it’s fluffy). Mix in the vanilla. Stir in the flour mixture along with the chocolate bits and knead briefly, just until smooth. Shape into a roll and chill for at least 1 hour. Slice carefully, and bake for 8-10 minutes at 375 F. Yields about 30 cookies, somewhat lacey.

Extra dough may be stored in the freezer, and brought back to a warmer temperature before slicing.

Optional: Roll in a mixture of powdered sugar and ground ginger before baking. Delicious!



Linked to: Pennywise Platter

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19 thoughts on “Dark Chocolate Buckwheat Cookies

    • Yes, buckwheat flour makes excellent pancakes, crepes, and I like muffins with a bit of buckwheat in them too. I find sorghum flour and brown rice flour to have less pleasing textures, but the buckwheat has a stronger flavor. It’s not neutral!

  1. Thank you for baking from my blog. I’m glad you found something to make with buckwheat. I think these are the 101 Cookbook cookies.Dark chocolate sounds really good here. I love experimenting with buckwheat as an alternative grain, and will hopefully make blinis one day.

  2. I’ve never used buckwheat before but that’s what I love about SRC, it gives everyone a chance to move out of their comfort zones and try something different.

  3. I really like buckwheat flour too…although it does tend to make things an ugly color, you’re right! I figure if it tastes good that’s the most important thing. ;)

  4. I like buckwheat because it’s soft and effortless to grind in my hand flour mill. Any idea why? And the nutritional implications of the why?

    • Not a clue. Although, examining it, there is not a true “bran” since it’s a seed, not a grain. The moisture content might also be slightly different. How do quinoa and amaranth feel?

      However, on quick google, I did discover that they do quite a bit interesting research on food using rice cake machines. Okra cakes, anyone? (Unsurprisingly, when you heat buckwheat “rice” cakes, variables like hardness, bioactive chemical content, color, structure, etc all shift.)

    • I know, her blog makes me want to bake beautiful things. Yes, I think the only problem with these was the gluten-free’ization of the recipe. It takes a few tries to work out the substitutions sometimes.

  5. Deeba has one of the most beautiful blogs to look at (and read!). I think the only thing I have used buckwheat for was pancakes….and of course that hasn’t been in a long time because Grumpy gripes whenever I do what he considers out of the norm. I’ve been getting bolder though, and while he still complains, he eats it (or goes hungry.) ;o)

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